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cp.saranghaeyo.mharbhie
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Fri Sep 05, 2008 5:19 am

Hello. How are you? An-nyo'ng-ha-se-yo?
Thank you Kam-sa-ham-ni-da
Good-bye (to one who is leaving) An-nyo'ng-hi-ka-se-yo

Koreans do not refer to their language as "Korean." What it's called depends on where you are. In North Korea, the language is frequently called Joseonmal, or more formally, Joseoneo. In South Korea, it is known as Hangungmal, or more formally, Hangugeo. The language is sometimes colloquially called Urimal, "our language."

Although the Korean language has adopted many words from the Chinese over the centuries and it seems to resemble Japanese grammatically, its phonetic system differs completely. Korean is not a tonal language like Chinese and Vietnamese, where tonal inflection can change the meaning of words. In Korean, there is little variation in accent and pitch. The form and meaning of root words remains essentially unchanged regardless of the tone of speech.

When speaking Korean, the general rule is to evenly stress phrases and sentences. When reading or speaking questions, the inflection is upward at end of the sentence just as in English. While it can take a long time to achieve anything resembling fluency in Korean, you can take heart and credit for whatever linguistic skills you do acquire by considering that, while the Hangul ( ) script is easy to learn, the Korean language ranks among the world's three hardest languages to master.

There is more to learning Korean that simply memorizing words and phrases. This is a language deeply tied to Korean culture and, like the Japanese language, it is unique in the sense that it supports an extensive "honor system" through additional sets of letters that link verbs and nouns in accordance with the rank of the person you speak with. It is a way to reflect the status of the person to whom you are talking.

Cultural distinctions reflecting relative levels of superiority are so strong and the language is so honor sensitive that failing to use the proper honorific phrases can be very disturbing and lead to social conflict. Young Koreans learn to use the proper honorific phrases quickly, often by getting roughed up by an older friend or sibling for being disrespectful.

Because of this honor system, many Koreans are hesitant to teach you "just a few" Korean words. You cannot say the same thing to everyone. What you say - not the words, but the connecting phrases and endings - must change according to the person's relative rank or status. At one extreme, an adult would sound ridiculous using "superior phrases" to say "Hi" to a child. At the other extreme however, you could get thrown out of someone's home for not using superior honorific phrases to the elders living there.

The following guides to pronunciation are nontechnical in nature and ignore many fine points, but they are adequate to help you pronounce Korean words.

The 14 "normal" consonants in Hangul are fairly easy to pronounce. In general, they are spoken much softer when in the middle of a word, particularly between two vowels. A silent "o" (ng) begins words that start with a vowel sound.

There are 5 double consonants that can be described as "stopped" or "stressed" consonants. When pronouncing these consonants, pause to build up tension, but instead of "exploding" the consonant sound, stress the following vowel.

Korean consonants and the two semi-vowels "w" and "y" are generally pronounced as they are in English with the following exceptions: an apostrophe following a consonant indicates that it is aspirated; accompanied by a marked exhalation of air. The aspirated consonants (ch', k', p', and t') closely approximate the corresponding English consonants. The unaspirated consonants (ch, k, p, and t) are closer to the corresponding French consonants. As an example, the "p" in P'yông'yang is pronounced much harder than the "p" in the word pyong. Note: Double consonants in the middle of a word are actually pronounced double.Except for apostrophes after the above consonants, an apostrophe mark is used to indicate a word division. For example, Tan'gun should be read like Tan gun, not Tang un.

Hangul contains 10 basic vowel sounds , all of which are fairly easy to remember and pronounce. They are generally spelled (and pronouced) with the silent "o" (ng) as the intial consonant.

The biggest problem with Hangul's 11 dipthongs , or double vowels, is that they can be quite difficult to distinguish. Confusing (or blending) the two sounds does not cause much confusion for the listener, but being able to generalize the sounds at the begining is key to learning these syllables. They are different and an effort to make some distinction is necessary.

Korean Vocabulary

The vocabulary of "pure" Korean words is rather small. A fairly large number of words are actually "loan words" adopted from other languages during Korea's long history of cultural contact with other nations. The majority of these loan-words are of Chinese origin, often called Sino-Korean words, a reflection of the Chinese cultural influence on Korea. As a result, the Korean language uses a dual system of native and Sino-Korean words, including two sets of numerals which are interchangeable in some cases, but mutually exclusive in others. Native Korean words are significantly outnumbered by Sino-Korean words, a situation by no means unique to Korea. About half the English language is said to have European origins.

Korean has also taken on a surprising number of words from the West which are called Oi-rae-eo, literally "words coming from abroad." As Korea adopted words from English, it changing the pronunciation only slightly to make the words easier to speak in Korean. The gradual process of modernization has resulted in a steady flow of Western words entering the Korean language. Although the majority of these "loan words" are technical or scientific, Western terms have been introduced into almost every aspect of Korean life. Some of the easily recognized adaptations are: kola (cola), kopi (coffee), plaet-fom (platform) cham-pu (shampoo), ais-krim (ice cream), taeksi (taxi), wiski (whiskey), nait-klop (nightclub), and koktel pati (cocktail party).
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cp.saranghaeyo.mharbhie
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Fri Sep 05, 2008 5:26 am

Korean Phrases
Meeting People
Nice to meet you = BAN-GAP SUP-NEE-DA
You’re welcome : gwaench’ansumnida
My name is : che irumun imnida
I come from : ch’onun e so watsumnida
Transport
I want to get off here : yogiyae naeryojuseyo
I want to go to : e kago shipsumnida
Take me to my hotel : hotel-lo gap-see-da
Accomodation
May I see the room?: pang’ul polsu issoyo?
Do you have anything cheaper?: tossan kot sun opsumnigga?
Please give me my key: yolse jom juseyo
Where is the bathroom : byun-soh uh-dee-yip-nee-ga
Food
Restaurant: shikdang
I’m vegetarian: ch’aeshik juwi imnida
The menu, please: menyurul poyo juseyo
The bill please: kyesanso juseyo
In a shop
How much does it cost?: olmayeyo?
That’s too expensive: nomu pissayo
Can I have a discount?: chim ssage juseyo
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Fri Sep 05, 2008 9:03 am

i have a question.. does anyone here who knows what is the difference between hangul and hanja? well as we all know hanja is the term used in north korea. i havent seen any letters of NK before.
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:31 am

hanja is chinese-inspired system of writing. It still have korean characters but the other characters in the system are chinese. It's a mixture of korean and chinese. Japanese writings also have a chinese-inspired system of writing. It is called "Kanji".
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Sun Sep 07, 2008 8:32 pm


" Korean
's two ways of writing "


( the Han
Guel and the Hanja )




Hanja is the
Korean name for Chinese characters. More
specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters borrowed from
Chinese and incorporated into the
Korean
language
with Korean phonetics. Hanja-mal or hanja-eo refers to words which can be written with hanja,
and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to
Classical Chinese writing, although
"hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because
hanja never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to
traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters. Only a small number of hanja
characters are modified or unique to Korean
. By contrast, many of the Chinese characters
currently in use in Japanese (kanji) and
Chinese have been simplified, and contain fewer strokes than the corresponding
hanja characters.
Although a phonetic Korean alphabet, now known as hangul, had been created by a team of
scholars commissioned in the 1440's by
King
Sejong
, it did not come into widespread use until the late
19th and early 20th century. Thus, until that time it was necessary to be fluent
in reading and writing hanja in order to be literate in Korean, as the vast majority of Korean literature and most other Korean documents were written in hanja. Today, hanja
play a different role. Scholars who wish to study Korean history must study hanja in order to read
historical documents. For the general public, learning a certain number of hanja
is very helpful in understanding words that are formed with them, in much the
same way that understanding Ancient
Greek
, Latin, and other ancient languages
can give a deeper understanding of the
Modern
English
vocabulary. Hanja are not used to write native [b]Korean words, which are always
rendered in hangul, and even words of Chinese origin — hanja-eo (한자어,
漢字語) — are written with the native hangul alphabet most of the
time.



EXAMPLES



  1. 修道 — spiritual discipline
  2. 受渡 — receipt and delivery
  3. 囚徒 — prisoner
  4. 水都 — 'city of water' (e.g. Hong
    Kong
    and Naples)
  5. 水稻 — rice
  6. 水道 — drain
  7. 隧道 — tunnel
  8. 首都 — capital (city)
  9. 手刀 — hand-knife


for
more info; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanja









Hangul

(pronounced /ˈhɑːŋɡʊl/, or [b]Korean [haːnɡɯl] (help·info)) is the native
alphabet of the
[b]Korean
language
, as distinguished from
the
logographicSino-Korean hanja system. It is
the official
script of
North Korea,
South Korea and the
Yanbian [b]Korean Autonomous
Prefecture
of China.
Hangul is a
phonemic alphabet
organized into
syllabic blocks.
Each block consists of at least two of the 24 Hangul letters (jamo), with at least one each of the 14
consonants and 10
vowels. These syllabic blocks can be written horizontally from left to
right as well as vertically from top to bottom in columns from right to left.
Originally, the alphabet had several additional letters (see obsolete jamo). For a phonological description of the
letters, see Korean

phonology
.


EXAMPLES





  • Simple vowels

    • Horizontal letters: these are mid-high back vowels.

      • light ㅗ o
      • dark ㅜ u
      • dark ㅡ eu (ŭ)


    • Vertical letters: these were once low or front vowels. (ㅓ eo
      has since migrated to the back of the mouth.)


      • light ㅏ a
      • dark ㅓ eo (ŏ)
      • neutral ㅣ i






  • Compound jamo. Hangul never had a w, except for
    Sino-Korean etymology. Since an o or
    u before an a or eo became a [w] sound, and [w] occurred nowhere else, [w] could always be analyzed as a
    phonemic o or u, and no
    letter for [w] was needed. However, vowel
    harmony is observed: yinu with yineo
    for ㅝ wo; yanga with yango for ㅘ
    wa:


    • wa = ㅗ
      o + ㅏ a

    • wo = ㅜ
      u + ㅓ eo

    • wae = ㅗ
      o + ㅐ ae

    • we = ㅜ
      u + ㅔ e






The compound
jamo ending in ㅣ i were originally
diphthongs. However, several have
since evolved into pure vowels:





    • ae = ㅏ
      a + ㅣ i

    • e = ㅓ
      eo + ㅣ i

    • wae = ㅘ
      wa + ㅣ i

    • oe = ㅗ
      o + ㅣ i

    • we = ㅝ
      wo + ㅣ i

    • wi = ㅜ
      u + ㅣ i

    • ui = ㅡ
      eu + ㅣ i






The simple
iotated vowels are,





    • ya from ㅏ
      a

    • yeo from
      eo

    • yo from ㅗ
      o

    • yu from ㅜ
      u






There
are also two iotated diphthongs,





    • yae from
      ae

    • ye from ㅔ
      e



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"아 자!!! 안 녕 하 제 요!!!!
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Sun Sep 07, 2008 9:17 pm

ah i see! thanks for giving me the info, but still im a bit confused! anyways thanks again! KAMSAHMNIDA! KOMAPSUMNIDA! *bows*
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Fri Sep 12, 2008 4:39 am

ay enjoy tlaga ang korean language!!!!!
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Fri Sep 12, 2008 4:49 am

정말 멋진 새로운 언어를 배우는...... hahaha... thnx pla mhay ha nka google translate ako hehehehehehe
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Fri Sep 12, 2008 5:00 am

여기에 인터넷 카페가 있습니까? are there any internet cafe's here

전 지방 레이디. im a fat lady....(hindi ako ha)

나는 섹시한 숙녀. im a sexy lady. lol!

도와줄 수 있죠? can you help me..
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Fri Sep 12, 2008 8:13 am

coffeeprincessangel wrote:
정말 멋진 새로운 언어를 배우는...... hahaha... thnx pla mhay ha nka google translate ako hehehehehehe

-==아무 문제 - no problem...
-== its just sharing what i have... lol! lol!

komapsumnida for using it..

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


EUN ae.... CP addict!
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Sat Sep 13, 2008 5:08 am

-=reminding

-=every body please

-=speak in Korean or in English

-=on posting!!

-=for the benefit of the foreigners!!

-=ok? lol!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"아 자!!! 안 녕 하 제 요!!!!
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Thu Sep 18, 2008 8:29 am

hey guys! can you romanize it? because most of the time i use PC, not laptop! ahha!! i cant read the hangul! lol! haha!!
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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Fri Sep 19, 2008 3:12 am

ahhh... sure.... we'll try our best....
AJA!!!
Very Happy Very Happy

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


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PostSubject: Re: Korean Grammar   Wed Oct 08, 2008 8:49 pm

KAMSAHMNIDA CHINGGU^^
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